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A recent UltraFlex demo proves that using Induction Heating, Teflon insulation onto a wire can be heated from the outside, without damaging the wire.

October 4th, 2017 – Yet another application of Induction Heating has been recently demonstrated by UltraFlex Power Technologies – uniform shrink-fitting of Teflon insulation onto a wire, using induction heating and a stainless steel pipe as a susceptor.

The goal of this Induction Heating demonstration was to achieve high-quality shrink-fitting for a wire 0.014 cm (0.035 in) in diameter, under temperature of 350°C (660°F), but preventing the overheating of the inner wire so it does not get damaged in the process. To achieve this, a stainless steel pipe was used as a susceptor to heat the Teflon insulation around the wire. A simple fixture kept the pipe in place, so the wire and insulation would not touch the hot surface of the pipe. A thermocouple was attached to one end of the tube and to the induction generator to use the generator’s thermo-regulation.

UltraFlex Low Power Induction Systems from the UltraHeat S Series had been used in the process, along with an UltraFlex 3-turn induction coil. The initial heating was done under power set of 20%, temperature set 350°C (660°F), temperature zone 200°C (390°F), temperature offset 24°C (75°F). A 2 kW air cooled unit was used in the process.

The wire was then moved through the heated stainless steel pipe, used as a susceptor. As a result, the Teflon insulation was successfully shrink-fitted, with no wire damage, proving that Teflon insulation can be heated from the outside, using a controlled Induction Heating process.

The UltraFlex Low Power Induction System from the UltraHeat S Series used in this demo provides versatile induction heating, utilizing the latest switching power supply technology. It can be easily tuned to a variety of loads and coils.

About UltraFlex Power Technologies:
Ultraflex Power Technologies (ultraflexpower.com) manufactures and sells induction heating power supplies. Induction power supplies generate a precise, targeted electromagnetic field that induces heat in conductive materials without the need for a flame or any contact with the material.

An induction heating system consists of an induction power supply and a custom-designed inductor (also known as a coil). The induction power supplies are universal systems, with custom coils designed to optimize the heating process for the specific application. These systems can be used for heating conductive materials in variety of applications ranging from metal melting and heat-treating to medical and nanoparticle research.



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